International Journal of Korean History

International Journal of Korean History

Basic info

  • Publisher: Korea University, Center for Korean History
  • Country of publisher: korea, republic of
  • Date added to EuroPub: 2018/May/12

Subject and more

  • LCC Subject Category: History
  • Publisher's keywords: Korean History
  • Language of fulltext: english
  • Full-text formats available: PDF

Publication charges

  • Article Processing Charges (APCs): No
  • Submission charges: No
  • Waiver policy for charges? No

Editorial information

Open access & licensing

  • Type of License: CC BY-NC
  • License terms
  • Open Access Statement: Yes
  • Year open access content began: 2000
  • Does the author retain unrestricted copyright? False
  • Does the author retain publishing rights? False

Best practice polices

  • Permanent article identifier: DOI
  • Content digitally archived in: Other
  • Deposit policy registered in: None

This journal has '224' articles

Achievements and Future Tasks in the Field of Ancient Korean History

Achievements and Future Tasks in the Field of Ancient Korean History

Authors: Chang Rho Moon
( 13 downloads)
Abstract

Great qualitative and quantitative achievements have been made in the field of ancient Korean history since liberation sixty years ago. In particular, the volume of studies in the overall field of Korean history has in recent years grown explosively. One of the main themes which have emerged in connection with this phenomenon has been the annual publication of a review of the studies which were conducted on each period, and the outlook for that particular field of Korean history. Therefore, the task of reviewing all the papers published over the last sixty years and uncovering their meaning is an impossible one even when such an undertaking is limited solely to the field of ancient Korean history. As such, it is only natural that for such reasons the scope of this paper and of the arguments developed herein will be limited.

Keywords: Achievements, Future Tasks, Field of Ancient, Korean History
Main Points of Contention in Terms of the Studies on Tan'gun and Kojosŏn

Main Points of Contention in Terms of the Studies on Tan'gun and Kojosŏn

Authors: Bup Jong Cho
( 18 downloads)
Abstract

Kojosŏn(古朝鮮) is widely understood to be the first political body in the history of Korea. Within the paradigm of Korean history, Kojosŏn is perceived as having been composed of three political bodies with different characteristics: ‘Tan΄gun(檀君),’ ‘Kija(箕子)’, and ‘Wiman(衞滿)’. While references to the founding myth of Kojosŏn and to its mythological founder Tan΄gun first appear in the <Samguk yusa(三國遺事, Legends and History of the Three Kingdoms of Ancient Korea)>, and the <Jewang Ungi(帝王韻紀 Songs of Emperors and Kings>, the state of Kojosŏn’s relations with China are dealt with in the <Wiryak(魏略)>’, a work often cited in the <Sanguo zhi(三國志, Chronicles of the Three Kingdoms>. The archaeological and cultural evidence uncovered to date would seem to indicate that Kojosŏn spanned from the Bronze Age, which is characterized by lute-shaped bronze daggers, dolmens, and stone tombs, to the Iron Age. Evidence of Kojosŏn culture, which is unlike anything produced during the Chinese Bronze Age, has been found on the Liaodong Peninsula, in Northeast Manchuria, and on the Korean peninsula itself. In particular, Kojosŏn is known to have established extensive relations with Chinese political groups, who referred to it as Chosŏn, during the Warring States period, as well as during the transition between Qin(秦) and Han(漢). By the onset of the Wiman Chosŏn era, Kojosŏn had forged diplomatic ties with horse-riding nomads such as the Xiongnu(匈奴).

Keywords: Contention, Terms, Tan'gun and Kojosŏn
Trends in Koguryŏ's Relationship with Paekche and Silla during the 4th-7th Centuries

Trends in Koguryŏ's Relationship with Paekche and Silla during the 4th-7th Centuries

Authors: Jung Woon Yong
( 19 downloads)
Abstract

According to the Samguk sagi(三國史記, History of Three Kingdoms) and Samguk yusa(三國遺事, Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms), Koguryŏ was founded by Chu Mong in 37 BC.1 Koguryŏ was originally founded in the Hwanin(Huanren) area of China. The capital was established in the basin of a river called the Cholbonch΄ŏn or Piryusu. Despite the fact that he never even constructed a royal palace, Chu Mong, who had escaped from Puyŏ and resettled in the Cholbon area, was elevated to the status of founder of Koguryŏ and received the title of King Tongmyŏngsŏng(Tongmyŏngsŏng wang; r. 37 BC~19 BC). According to the Samguk saki, Koguryŏ was able to expand its territory during the reigns of the Tongmyŏngsŏng wang and King Yurimyŏng(r. BC 19~AD 18) by subjugating smaller neighboring polities such as the Malgal(Mohe; 靺鞨), Piryu(沸流國), Haengin(荇人國), and North Okchŏ(北沃沮).

Keywords: Koguryŏ's Relationship, Paekche, Silla during
Characteristics and Changes in the Political System during the Three Kingdoms Era

Characteristics and Changes in the Political System during the Three Kingdoms Era

Authors: Deog Jae Jeon
( 38 downloads)
Abstract

A multitude of studies on Silla’s 6-Pu system(the political and rulling system) have appeared since the discovery of the Silla monuments in Pongpyŏng, Ulchin County in 1988(Ulchin Pongpyŏng Sillabi) and in Naengsuri, Yŏngil County(Yŏngil Naengsuri Sillabi) in 1989. In the aftermath of these discoveries, the trend has been towards explaining the political and ruling systems of the early Three Kingdoms using the socalled the theory of Pu system.1 According to this theory, while the ability to conduct foreign affairs of these pu during the early stages of the Three Kingdoms era was subjugated to that of their respective royal households, they nevertheless acted as autonomous political units which exercised a great deal of control over internal matters. Moreover, the ability of the pu to play a leading role in managing the nation’s political affairs made it possible for them to ensure their long-term survival. Furthermore, as the political and ruling structures were in effect regulated by the pu, the political system in place during the early period of the Three Kingdoms era has come to be known as a ‘Pu system’. This system was eventually abandoned in favor of a centralized political system revolving around the monarch during the middle stages of the Three Kingdoms as the increase in agricultural production brought changes to the village-based society.

Keywords: Characteristics and Changes, Political System during, Kingdoms Era
The Cultural Characteristics of Korea's Ancient Kaya Kingdom

The Cultural Characteristics of Korea's Ancient Kaya Kingdom

Authors: Taesik Kim
( 68 downloads)
Abstract

Discussions on Korea’s ancient history have for the most part focused on the so-called ‘Three Kingdoms era’ while all but ignoring the history of Kaya. This phenomenon has largely been the result of the emergence of a Silla-based perception of history since the Koryŏ era, and of the acceptance in the modern period of distorted historical notions which have their origins in the Japanese colonial era.1 Nevertheless, truth cannot be hidden forever. In this regard, the archaeological excavations which have recently taken place in former Kaya areas have resulted in a marked improvement in the quality of the Kaya-related studies conducted by Korean and Japanese scholars. 2 However, the results of these recent studies on Kaya have yet to be reflected in the work conducted in the western world.

Keywords: The Cultural Characteristics, Korea's Ancient, Kaya Kingdom
Korea and the Koreans in the Russian press of 1904-1905

Korea and the Koreans in the Russian press of 1904-1905

Authors: Igor Ermachenko
( 15 downloads)
Abstract

The importance of Russian-Japanese war of 1904 – 1905 for the actualization of the image of Korea and the Koreans in Russian public thought is hard to overestimate. It was at that time, on the threshold of the fight for the spheres of interest in the Far East, that the first quality reviews and studies devoted to Korea, including reports of research expeditions, appeared in Russia 1 . In 1900, the Ministry of Finance published a fundamental “Description of Korea” in three parts with the total volume of 1250 pages that, according to contemporaries’ opinions, did not have a counterpart abroad2. However, it was the war that turned Korea, “this strange country” 3, “the corner of the Far East we used to be mostly indifferent to” 4, into an object of common interest for the mass reader.

Keywords: Korea and the Koreans, Russian press
A New Challenge to the Study of the Political History of Chosŏn-Prof. Haboush's 『A Heritage of Kings: One Man's Monarchy in the Confucian World

A New Challenge to the Study of the Political History of Chosŏn-Prof. Haboush's 『A Heritage of Kings: One Man's Monarchy in the Confucian World

Authors: Sung Woo Kim
( 14 downloads)
Abstract

After having completed her graduate studies at Columbia University (PhD in Korean and Chinese History) in 1978 and serving as a researcher at the University of Illinois, Professor JaHyun Kim Haboush joined Professor G. Ledyard as a senior research fellow and lecturer in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at Columbia University. Prof. Haboush’s main research field is the history of Chosŏn, with a special focus on the history of politics and thought during the latter period of Chosŏn. She has conducted studies on the monarchy during late Chosŏn, choosing to focus on King Yŏngjo in her first work, <A Heritage of Kings: One Man’s Monarchy in the Confucian World> (1988). This is the work which shall be reviewed in the current study. In addition, Prof. Haboush has shown a keen interest in classic literature, which has led her to carry out the publication of the translated version of <The Memoirs of Lady Hyegyông: The Autobiographical Writings of a Crown Princess of Eighteenth-Century Korea >(1996). Her current areas of interest include themes such as Confucianism and political culture, literature, and gender issues.

Keywords: Political History, Heritage of Kings
The Characteristics of the Ruling Structure during Early Chosŏn

The Characteristics of the Ruling Structure during Early Chosŏn

Authors: Jong-rok Oh
( 16 downloads)
Abstract

One of the main features of modern historical studies in Korea has been the fact that a great number of scholars have focused on comparing the similarities between the development of Korean history and that of world history. As part of the process of establishing their own theories of history, these scholars have partaken in debates over the classification of the various periods of Korean history and the nature of society during each of these periods, as well as developed detailed study results and historical descriptions which have emphasized either the universal or unique nature of Korean history. To this end, scholars’ perceptions of the historical standing of the Chosŏn dynasty, or of the characteristics of Chosŏn society, have tended to vary in accordance with the particular topic which these scholars’ studies adopted. Nevertheless, very little debate has emerged when it comes to the ruling structure of Chosŏn, which has been generally defined as a centralized ruling system.1 More to the point, early Chosŏn has been perceived as a period in which Koryŏ’s centralized system was not only inherited, but strengthened. Furthermore, early Chosŏn has been regarded as having featured a centralized ruling structure that was more robust than the ones in place during the middle and late stages of Chosŏn.

Keywords: The Characteristics, Ruling Structure during, Early Chosŏn
The Dispatch of Central Government Envoys (Pongmyŏng sasin) during Early Chosŏn

The Dispatch of Central Government Envoys (Pongmyŏng sasin) during Early Chosŏn

Authors: Soon-nam Kim
( 17 downloads)
Abstract

The Chosŏn dynasty was born out of the efforts to conduct the reforms needed to overcome the contradictions, which engulfed Koryŏ during its final days, a period marked by deep political, social, and economic chaos. As part of its efforts to establish a new governing order following its foundation, Chosŏn created several central and local organizations to facilitate the advent of a centralized governance system. The preferred governance structure in local areas was one that was based on the positions of kwanch’alsa (provincial governor) and suryŏng (local magistrate). Moreover, this local structure was also perceived as a means of solidifying the centralized government system, which Chosŏn hoped to bring about.

Keywords: Dispatch, Central Government, Envoysduring Early Chosŏn
The Kingship and Establishment of the Chohoe System in Early Chosŏn

The Kingship and Establishment of the Chohoe System in Early Chosŏn

Authors: Jae-hoon Kang
( 15 downloads)
Abstract

The chohoe (朝會, court conference) was a ceremony symbolizing royal authority which was conducted in traditional East Asian societies heavily influenced by Confucianism. The Chinese character for cho (朝) has traditionally been understood to express meritorious retainers’ act of meeting the king. Meanwhile, the term chohoe meant the actions carried out as part of the relationship between ruler and subject. More specifically, the term chohoe connoted the regulations and ceremonial etiquette which governed the meritorious retainers’ act of meeting the ruler. Therefore, the ruler-subject relationship exposed through chohoe ceremonies served as an active expression of the monarch-centered order.

Keywords: The Kingship, Establishment, the Chohoe System
The Establishment of National Rites and Royal Authority during Early Chosŏn

The Establishment of National Rites and Royal Authority during Early Chosŏn

Authors: Hyung-ju Han
( 16 downloads)
Abstract

Confucian rites and ceremonies can be regarded as the symbolized expressions of a conceptual and abstractive political and social ideology that was based on a perception of Confucian classics (kyŏnghak) which was given substance through ritual activities (haengnye). In the premodern era, rulers in East Asia perceived the need to use the symbolism of rites (禮, ye) rather than physical compulsion to effectively generate and maintain political authority. The <Shuowenjiezi (說文解字, Elucidations of the Signs and Explications of the Graphs)> Compiled by Xu Shen explains the etymology of ye as the description of a person worshipping a god by dedicating an offering in sacrificial vessels. 1 Along with exhibiting the religious attributes of rites (ye), such an explanation makes evident that the process of rites (ye) was used as symbolism to convey the fact that the person who played the leading role in the ritual ceremony had in effect received a mandate from heaven.

Keywords: National Rites, Royal Authority, during Early Chosŏn
The Dual Kingship and State Management during the Early period of the Reign of King Sejong

The Dual Kingship and State Management during the Early period of the Reign of King Sejong

Authors: Hyeon-gu Min
( 13 downloads)
Abstract

The decision by the third king of the Chosŏn dynasty, King T´aejong, to abdicate after 18 years on the throne paved the way for his own son Sejong to assume the throne. While King Sejong, in his capacity as the 4th king of Chosŏn, managed the state for 32 years, King T´aejong contributed in his own right to the establishment of the royal authority of the newly-founded Chosŏn dynasty. King Sejong, who succeeded King T´aejong, was not only an instrumental figure in terms of the establishment of the culture and institutions of Chosŏn, but also developed the six garrison forts (sagun) and Four Yalu Outposts (yukchin), while also leaving behind great cultural achievements that greatly influenced the development of Korean culture and history, such as the creation of the Han´gŭl (indigenous Korean alphabet) system. The 50- year period during which King T´aejong and King Sejong reigned can thus rightfully be regarded as the most important period in terms of the development of the Chosŏn dynasty.

Keywords: The Dual Kingship, State Management, during
Analysis of Local Aristocrats (士族) in the Asan Area During the Chosŏn Era as Viewed Through the Sama pangmok(司馬榜目)

Analysis of Local Aristocrats (士族) in the Asan Area During the Chosŏn Era as Viewed Through the Sama pangmok(司馬榜目)

Authors: Jung-joo Lee
( 18 downloads)
Abstract

Various significant studies have been conducted on the aristocrats who ruled over local communities (在地士族, chaeji sajok) during the Chosŏn era. As part of its efforts to secure the basic information needed to perpetuate its colonial rule over Korea, the Japanese colonial government launched several investigations into the state of the hyanggyo (鄕校, county schools) and sŏwŏn (書院, private academies) which served as the main sources of the local aristocrats power, as well as into local organizations such as the hyangyak (鄕約, village code) and kye (契, groups of individuals who pooled financial resources for loans and investment purposes). These basic materials in turn yielded many studies after liberation in 1945 on various aspects of the local aristocracy (sajok), such as the structure, management, and change in the local village control system. Nevertheless, basic tasks such as the compilation of lists of the aristocrats in local areas have yet to be carried out. This oversight can mainly be explained by the fact that existing studies have for the most part relied on ancient documents such as the hyangan (鄕案, register of local aristocrats), kyosaengan (校生案, register of aristocrats who attended the hyanggyo), hyanggyu (鄕規, autonomous village regulations), hyangyak, and ŭpchi (邑誌, topographies of all districts/ township annals).

Keywords: Analysis, Local Aristocrats, Asan Area, Chosŏn Era
The Formation and Evolution of the Koguryŏ-centric Perception of the International Order

The Formation and Evolution of the Koguryŏ-centric Perception of the International Order

Authors: Hirokata Shinohara
( 17 downloads)
Abstract

One of the primary goals of the field of historical studies is the restoration of history. The task of identifying phenomena based on the facts found in various historical materials, which is referred to as the critical analysis of historical data, has long been regarded as a justifiable and objective form of methodology. However, as these historical materials reflect the subjective viewpoint of the person(s) who wrote them, the process of selecting the data which is important, as well as the interpretation of this data, is naturally imbibed with a high degree of subjectivity.

Keywords: The Formation and Evolution, Koguryŏ-centric Perception
Political Trends of Hong Bog Won Clan in the Period of Mongol Domination

Political Trends of Hong Bog Won Clan in the Period of Mongol Domination

Authors: Oleg Pirozhenko
( 15 downloads)
Abstract

The Mongol invasion, which occurred in the period of the military regime in Koryo, as well as the period of Yuan domination and interference that followed the Koryo-Mongol wars and reconciliation, constitute one of the most important stages in the history of Korea. The ordeals cost a terrible loss of human lives and brought a gigantic damage to Koryo’s economy, but at the same time the military regime was overthrown, significant changes in socio-economic structure were brought about and new social forces came to the Koryo’s political scene, adopting the new ideology of Neo-Confucianism which itself came to Korea through the Yuan empire.

Keywords: Political Trends, Won ClanMongol Domination

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