International Journal of Korean History

International Journal of Korean History

Basic info

  • Publisher: Korea University, Center for Korean History
  • Country of publisher: korea, republic of
  • Date added to EuroPub: 2018/May/12

Subject and more

  • LCC Subject Category: History
  • Publisher's keywords: Korean History
  • Language of fulltext: english
  • Full-text formats available: PDF

Publication charges

  • Article Processing Charges (APCs): No
  • Submission charges: No
  • Waiver policy for charges? No

Editorial information

Open access & licensing

  • Type of License: CC BY-NC
  • License terms
  • Open Access Statement: Yes
  • Year open access content began: 2000
  • Does the author retain unrestricted copyright? False
  • Does the author retain publishing rights? False

Best practice polices

  • Permanent article identifier: DOI
  • Content digitally archived in: Other
  • Deposit policy registered in: None

This journal has '224' articles

The Saga of Jeong v. Onoda Cement

The Saga of Jeong v. Onoda Cement

Authors: Semoon Chang
( 16 downloads)
Abstract

Numerous civil lawsuits have been filed against Japan and Japanese businesses by Korean victims of World War II since 1972 and by American victims since the Hayden Act of 1999. The hypothesis of this paper is that the 1951 Treaty of Peace with Japan makes it almost, if not totally, impossible for individual victims of the Japan’s war crimes to recover any economic damages that they may have suffered. This hypothesis is explained through review of the progression of Jeong v. Onoda Cement, known also as Jeong v. Taiheiyo Cement since the purchase of Onoda Cement by Taiheiyo during litigation. This review is focused on presentation of Judge Lichtman’s ruling on a motion for summary judgment by defendants. A ruling by the California Court of Appeal that favored defendants was appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court on October 12, 2004. The saga of Jeong v. Onoda Cement ended on January 18, 2005.

Keywords: Japanese residents in Korea, moral economy, Grain Export Prohibition Order, ‘modernization’, Political culture, Treaty of Peace, Jeong v. Onoda Cement, Jeong v. Teiheiyo Cement, Forced labor, Hayden Act, Peter D. Lichtman, Japan-Korea Agreement
The Memories of War and Peace During the Between-War Period : A Study on the ‘Pacific Conference’ and the Roles of Intellectuals of Three East Asian Countries

The Memories of War and Peace During the Between-War Period : A Study on the ‘Pacific Conference’ and the Roles of Intellectuals of Three East Asian Countries

Authors: Jung-hyoo Ko
( 18 downloads)
Abstract

The 21st century is the era of globalization and regionalism. On one side of the world, globalization has been processed by the impetus of the US and on the other side, the solidarity between countries, as seen in the EU, has been strengthened. How globalizaton and regionalism work together is one of the concerns we have to watch closely. In Korea, in the mid 1990s disccourse on East Asia emerged and it has changed into discussion on the Northeast Asian Community with the turn of the century. To illustrate, the Northeast Asian Intellectuals' Solidarity Korea, NAIS Korea, made the Incheon Declaration 2001. This declaration, initiated by 333 intellectuals in Korea, claimed that Northeast Asia will lead the world in the 21st century and called for the participation and solidarity of intellectuals in this region (NAIS Korea ed., 2004).

Keywords: The Institute of Pacific Relations(IPR), Pacific Conference, East Asian Intellectuals, war and peace
The Establishment and Activities of the Korean-American Association During the Era of the American Military Government

The Establishment and Activities of the Korean-American Association During the Era of the American Military Government

Authors: Eun Heo
( 14 downloads)
Abstract

The era of the U.S. Army Military Government in Korea (hereafter USAMGIK) can be perceived as a period in which the Korean society located south of the 38th parallel reencountered the United States after having removed the fetters of Japanese colonial rule. The South Korean public’s perception of the United States underwent rapid changes during the three years in which the American Military Government occupied Korea, which resulted in many contradictory assessments of the United States emerging. Put differently, this was a period in which contradictory and conflicting evaluations of America existed alongside one another. To this end, the U.S. was regarded as both a ‘liberation’ and ‘occupation’ force; as a ‘democratic’ and ‘imperialist’ state; and as an ‘advanced civilized’ and ‘mammonist’ country. These contradictory opinions were directly related to political groups and the Korean public’s perception of reality. To this end, while various sectors of the public experienced the process of encountering the U.S. occupation forces differently, this was also the case with the assorted political groups, each of which had its own approach and methods to the establishment of a nation state during the era of the American Military Government.

Keywords: The Korean-American Association(한미협회), U.S. Army Military Government, Expansionism, Frontierism, Cold War, recollection, Discourse
Sim Kiwŏn’s Revolt and the Return of Im Kyŏngŏp

Sim Kiwŏn’s Revolt and the Return of Im Kyŏngŏp

Authors: Sun-ah Lee
( 20 downloads)
Abstract

In the spring of 2007, a novel entitled < Namhan Fortress (Namhan sansŏng)> was published. This novel is unique in that it perfectly captures the dilemma faced by Chosŏn at the time of the Second Manchu Invasion (pyŏngja horan). More to the point, Chosŏn found itself having to choose between continued adherence to its perceived moral obligations and the reality on the ground. In this regard, the main protagonists of this story are King Injo, who sought refuge within the walls of Namhan Fortress, Choe Myŏnggil, an advocate of the taking of a reconciliatory course of action, and Kim Sanghŏn, a member of the group that rejected all forms of heterodoxy. The story of the life of King Injo, who had come to the throne after having overthrown his uncle the Kwanghaegun, is without a doubt an interesting one. In the novel, King Injo is described as a tragic character who consistently agonized over the need to strike a balance between his kingdom’s moral obligations and the reality on the ground. One even feels a certain sense of sympathy for Injo who was forced to accept personal dishonor in order to save his beloved kingdom. The revealing of this side of King Injo has caused the traditional perception of this monarch to undergo certain changes.

Keywords: An Iksin, Sim Kiwŏn, Im Kyŏngŏp, Injo, The Manchu Invasion of 1636, anti-Qing mentality
The formation of the Posa kongsin’s political position and social networks during the reign of King Sukchong

The formation of the Posa kongsin’s political position and social networks during the reign of King Sukchong

Authors: Sang-sik Lee
( 13 downloads)
Abstract

The Kyŏngsin hwanguk (, Reversal of the Political Situation in the Year of Kyŏngsin) was an incident which served as the impetus for the collapse of the long-existing structure of factional politics that had functioned based on a system of checks and balances between the various factions.1 More to the point, this incident paved the way for the move away from factional politics and towards a series of political reversals (hwanguk chŏngchi). This period has been regarded as an important one when it comes to understanding the political history of late Chosŏn.

Keywords: Posa kongsins, Kyŏngsin hwan’uk, Kim Sŏkchu, Kim Man’i, Pokch’anggun’s brothers
Confucian Perspectives on Egalitarian Thought in Traditional Korea

Confucian Perspectives on Egalitarian Thought in Traditional Korea

Authors: Seung B. Kye
( 11 downloads)
Abstract

What roles did Confucian ideas and ruling mechanisms play in germinating and developing egalitarian thought in Korean history? Was Confucianism a great contribution or a critical obstacle? Or, did it take a neutral stance? Do those two ideologies, Confucianism and egalitarianism, mutually support each other in contemporary Korean society, or are they incompatible with each other? In order to understand the transition of Korean society from traditional to ‘modern’ as continuous rather than discontinuous, these questions are worth discussing not only because Confucian modes of social behavior still remain strong among the Koreans, but also because egalitarianism is one of the universal values for which humanity must continue to march.

Keywords: Confucianism, Chosŏn, slave, nobi, secondary son, sŏŏl, Zhu Xi, Confucius, barbarian, Manchu, Yu Insŏk, egalitarian
A Critical Review on the Issue of Proto-Nationalism during Late Chosŏn

A Critical Review on the Issue of Proto-Nationalism during Late Chosŏn

Authors: Tae-yong Huh
( 59 downloads)
Abstract

Much as is the case with the dichotomous expressions ‘modern’ and ‘premodern’, so-called ‘modern people’ have a tendency to identify the short historical period to which they belong as the modern, while referring to the overall and much longer period that preceded it as the premodern era.1 This particular vantage point is generally rooted in an enlightenment-based perception of history which views modernity as the natural culmination of history. In this regard, Francis Fukuyama’s <The End of History and the last man> can be regarded as a work that is profoundly derived from this perception. Based on this premise, human life in this modern era representing the final destination of mankind, while still potentially beset by limitations, is generally perceived as being both justified and perfect. Conversely, premodern history must inevitably This study is based on the author’s PhD dissertation, The Development of the Consciousness as the rightful heir to zhonghua and the Strengthening of the Perception of Ancient History in the Northern Area during Late Chosŏn (Chosŏn hugi Chunghwa kyesŭng ŭisikŭi chŏngaewa pukpang kodaesa insikŭi kanghwa), (2006, PhD dissertation, Korea University).

Keywords: Nationalism, Sin Ch΄aeho, Koguryŏ, Parhae, Sinocentrism
The Kŭn’gi Namin Faction’s Acceptance of the T’oegye School and the Establishment of the Sŏngho School

The Kŭn’gi Namin Faction’s Acceptance of the T’oegye School and the Establishment of the Sŏngho School

Authors: Hangsu Sin
( 14 downloads)
Abstract

Yi Ik was a Confucian scholar and erstwhile leader of the Kŭngi Namin (, Southerners) faction during the 18th century. In this regard, the Sŏngho School, of which Yi Ik was a central figure, constitutes one of the key power groups through which to understand politics and thought during this period. Various hypotheses have been advanced as pertains to the academic origins of the Sŏngho School. Attempts to recreate the academic genealogy of the Yi Ik-led Namin faction that emerged from the Kŭngi area (hereafter referred to as the Kŭngi Namin faction) have for the most part been based on the epitaphs written by Chae Chegong. To this end, the epitaphs state that there existed a clear line of succession that passed from Yi Hwang to Chŏng Ku and then Hŏ Mok. Given his standing as the student of Hŏ Mok, Yi Ik was therefore regarded as having emerged as the rightful successor of this academic lineage.

Keywords: Yi Ik, Sŏngho school, Doctrine of Yi Hwang, Yun Hyu, genealogy
Climate Change in East Asia and Agricultural Production Activities in Koryŏ and Japan during the 12th~13th centuries

Climate Change in East Asia and Agricultural Production Activities in Koryŏ and Japan during the 12th~13th centuries

Authors: Jung-ho Lee
( 14 downloads)
Abstract

The main materials used to analyze the Koryŏ period, namely the <Koryŏsa (, History of Koryŏ)> and <Koryŏsa chŏlyo ( , Essentials of Koryŏ History)>, include a significant amount of information pertaining to natural disasters. In addition to natural calamities such as droughts, floods, and damage from insects, these texts also dealt with astronomical phenomena such as solar and lunar eclipses, as well as comets. The <Koryŏsa>, which was rendered in the traditional annalistic and biographical style, compiled these records in separate sections entitled Astronomy ( , ch΄ŏnmunji) and the Five Elements ( , ohaengji).

Keywords: Climate Change, Natural Disasters, the Agricultural Promotion Policy, Agricultural Production Activities, Human Types of Responses
Koreans in Russia in the Context of History of Russian Immigration Policy

Koreans in Russia in the Context of History of Russian Immigration Policy

Authors: Alexander I. Petrov
( 17 downloads)
Abstract

The variety of ways of moving of people from one country to another and formation of ethnic groups in the countries of arrival (or in the socalled recipient countries) allows to define the general and special in history of those or other migratory streams. In given paper an attempt is undertaken to determine some features of history of the Korean immigration to and process of formation of the Korean community in Russia (the Soviet Union). The theme of given research paper has three groups of topical aspects which are very closely interconnected between each other. Firstly, it is necessity of constant elaborating, perfecting and more precise defining the historical facts on Koreans in Russia. Though there are many different books, articles and collections of documents on the subject published by the present time our knowledge about some facts and events in this history is very approximate. A fundamental academic history of Koreans in Russia, which could help young researchers and ordinary people to estimate the facts and events of the past and to form their opinion about them is not written yet.

Keywords: Russian Far East, Korean Community, Koreans, history, immigration, immigration policy, development
Old and New Reasons for the Controversy on Koguryŏ : a Geo-Political Comment

Old and New Reasons for the Controversy on Koguryŏ : a Geo-Political Comment

Authors: Maurizio Riotto
( 15 downloads)
Abstract

The following article is intended as a slightly modified version of the paper I presented at the ISKS (International Society for Korean Studies) workshop on the Dongbei Gongcheng and Koguryŏ, which was held in Vancouver (University of British Columbia) from August 11th to August 13th 2008. As a short study, an expression of my own personal conviction, this comment is basically a preliminary survey on a particularly delicate issue, or rather a controversy that is gradually edging its way into the field of academic study, as a result of the incentive of a number of scholars, who, I believe, are largely speaking in good faith. This is to some extent unavoidable, given the delicate equilibrium existing among the countries involved in the controversy. I feel I can safely say this paper reaches a conclusion with which many Koreans agree, but which simply “cannot” be discussed, or at least not on formal occasions. Meanwhile, as an individual super partes, I have chosen to approach the problem from a political perspective rather than from a strictly academic point of view. Naturally, any conclusions I may draw are to be considered entirely subjective - in other words, nothing other than a scholarly hypothesis. In any case, this paper concentrates on a topic hitherto neglected by the greater part of the bibliography dealing with the controversy on Koguryŏ, or simply the motives behind the controversy itself. Inevitably, in order to solve a problem, the causes need to be primarily identified. An attempt to identify the nature of the origins of the controversy on Koguryŏ is the purpose of this paper, as well as, hopefully, providing some insight into a possible solution.

Keywords: Reasons for the controversy on Koguryd, Chinese expansion, future of North Korea, Chinese-American Economic Relations, Reunification of Korea
Doubts about the Edition of the 〈Samguk yusa〉

Doubts about the Edition of the 〈Samguk yusa〉

Authors: Daejae Park
( 18 downloads)
Abstract

The <Samguk yusa (Legends and History of the Three Kingdoms of Ancient Korea)> compiled by the Koryŏ era Buddhist monk Ilyŏn (1206- 1289) is widely regarded as a classic in which the history and culture of ancient Korea are vividly recorded. However, the <Samguk yusa> was up until the Chosŏn era evaluated as a heretic work filled with untruths and nonsense, and the reliability of its records was denied. As the majority of its stories were based on Buddhism, it was only natural that the <Samguk yusa> was heavily criticized by the Confucian scholars of Chosŏn. However, Yi Nŭnghwa’s active use of its pages as historical materials with which to study Buddhism during the early 20th century, and Ch΄oe Namsŏn’s subsequent high evaluation of its historical value, resulted in the <Samguk yusa> becoming widely recognized after the liberation of the nation in 1945 as one of the two great sources, the other being the <Samguk sagi (History of the Three Kingdoms)> written by Kim Pusik, in terms of the study of the ancient Korean history.

Keywords: Samguk yusa, Imsin edition, elder edition, first edition
A Criticism of John Whitney Hall's Study on Ancient Korea-Japan Relations

A Criticism of John Whitney Hall's Study on Ancient Korea-Japan Relations

Authors: Jae-sok Choi
( 23 downloads)
Abstract

From 1985 to 2003 the writer examined the opinions of Japanese historians on ancient history of Japan. As a result he found that nearly all - about thirty - of the Japanese scholars on the history of ancient Japan insisted that the early part of the Samguk sagi (History of the Three Kingdoms) was a fabrication, or on that premise they contended that ancient Korea was Japan's colony. The truth was the other way round. Then the writer grew curious to know what opinions Western historians had on ancient Korea-Japan relations. His first object of interest was John Whitney Hall, an American scholar. After getting his PhD from Harvard, he was a professor at University of Michigan and the head of The Center for Japanese Studies of that university until 1961; he was professor at the History Department of Yale University at the time of writing his Japan: From Prehistory to Modern Times (New York: Dell Publishing Company, 1970). So he may well be said to be one of the most appropriate candidates for criticism. The first six chapters of the book - the part in which Hall deals with ancient history of Japan - have been examined from nine angles including the tumuli existing in Japan.

Keywords: The history of Ancient Korea-Japan relations, John Whitney Hall, Japanese historians on ancient history, the distortion of ancient history,Japan: From Prehistory to Modern Times
Commercial Activities of Chinese Merchants in the Late Nineteenth Century Korea : with a Focus on the Documents of Tong Shun Tai Archived at Seoul National University, South Korea

Commercial Activities of Chinese Merchants in the Late Nineteenth Century Korea : with a Focus on the Documents of Tong Shun Tai Archived at Seoul National University, South Korea

Authors: Ryota Ishikawa
( 23 downloads)
Abstract

In the late 19th century, treaties of commerce imposed by imperial Western powers compelled East Asian nations to participate in trade. Western merchants brought industrial products to exchange for the raw materials of the East, instigating and intensifying a separation of roles within the East Asian region. Asian merchants, Chinese merchants in particular, who were familiar with the local conditions, played a central role in intraregional trade. Without relying on support from their government, Chinese merchants built a vast pan-Asian commercial network based on territorial hometown connections and blood relations. The activities of Chinese merchants remained under-examined by scholars until the 1980s when Asian industrialization drew attention to the implications of the regional markets established in the late 19th century. This prompted further research into the Chinese merchants who were the major players in the market.

Keywords: Chinese overseas, Tong Shun Tai, Gwangdong Province, network, gaek-ju
Russo-U.S. Joint Investment and International Relations during the Taehan Empire: 1898-1900

Russo-U.S. Joint Investment and International Relations during the Taehan Empire: 1898-1900

Authors: Joonhwa Hong
( 15 downloads)
Abstract

During the Taehan Empire, the Department of the Royal Household (Kungnaebu) was the entity in charge of the country’s main mines. While the Unsan Mine was the first mine to fall under the control of the Department of the Royal Household in May 1895, the number of mines under its auspices increased exponentially after the king’s flight to the Russian Legation in 1896 (Agwan p'ach'ŏn). On June 23, 1898 alone, the Department of Agriculture and Commerce officially transferred some forty-three potentially high-yield mines to the Department of the Royal Household.1 Having seized the reins of power in the aftermath of the flight of the king to the Russian Legation in 1896, the royal family undertook this transfer as part of its efforts to increase the financial resources of the royal household. The royal household’s management of these mines revolved around allowing private citizens of Chosŏn to develop these structures and providing mining concessions to foreign nationalities. In exchange, the government levied mining taxes on domestic mine owners and shared in the profits earned by the foreign concessions.

Keywords: Imperialism, Neporozhnev, mines, the Department of the Royal Household, status quo

About Europub

EuroPub is a comprehensive, multipurpose database covering scholarly literature, with indexed records from active, authoritative journals, and indexes articles from journals all over the world. The result is an exhaustive database that assists research in every field. Easy access to a vast database at one place, reduces searching and data reviewing time considerably and helps authors in preparing new articles to a great extent. EuroPub aims at increasing the visibility of open access scholarly journals, thereby promoting their increased usage and impact.