A clinical profile and associated factors with typhoid fever in children at tertiary health care center

Journal Title: Medpulse International Journal of Pediatrics - Year 2017, Vol 2, Issue 1

Abstract

Background: Typhoid fever, caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) and Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A (S. Paratyphi A), has been estimated to cause approximately 27 million infections each year worldwide Aims and Objectives: To study Clinical profile and associated factors with Typhoid fever in Children at tertiary health care centre. Methodology: This was a cross-sectional study carried out in Children suffered from Typhoid fever at tertiary health care during one-year period i.e. January 2015 to January 2016. All the patient were diagnosed as typhoid fever if presented with fever (temperature>38C) for at least 3 days and their blood culture yielded S. typhi or Typhidot® test. During one year total 40 patients were enrolled into study. Result: In our study we have found that The majority of the patients were in the age group of 9-12 i.e.40%, 6-9 were 30%,3-6-17.5%, <3 were 12.5%. The majority of the patients were Male were 60%, Female were 40%. The most common clinical features were Fever in 87.5%, Vomiting in 72.5%, Diarrhea in 62.5%, Coated tongue in 57.5%, Hepatomegaly in 37.5%, Splenomegaly in 32.5%, Constipation in 22.5%, Abdominal pain in 17.5%. The most common associated factors studied in our study were Unsafe drinking water -72.5%, followed by Un-hygienic food -62.5%, Poor SES -52.5%, Overcrowding -47.5%, Non-availability of medicated soap for hand washing -32.5%, Nails not cut -27.5%, Malnourished-22.5%, Partially immunized / Unimmunized -17.5%, History of travelling -12.5%. Conclusion: It can be concluded form or study that the most common clinical features were Fever, Vomiting, Diarrhea, Coated tongue and organomegaly . The most common associated factors in our study were Unsafe drinking water, Un-hygienic food, Poor SES, Overcrowding, non-availability of medicated soap for hand washing, Nails not cut, Malnutrition, Partially immunization / Immunization, History of travelling etc.

Authors and Affiliations

Sanjay Pundalik Baviskar, Anant Ganpath Bendale

Keywords

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  • EP ID EP261603
  • DOI -
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How To Cite

Sanjay Pundalik Baviskar, Anant Ganpath Bendale (2017). A clinical profile and associated factors with typhoid fever in children at tertiary health care center. Medpulse International Journal of Pediatrics, 2(1), 12-14. https://europub.co.uk/articles/-A-261603