Studia Litterarum

Studia Litterarum

Basic info

  • Publisher: A.M. Gorky Institute of World Literature of the Russian Academy of Sciences
  • Country of publisher: russian federation
  • Date added to EuroPub: 2018/May/06

Subject and more

  • LCC Subject Category: Languages and Literature, Literature
  • Publisher's keywords: History of Philology, Comparative Studies, Folklore Studies, Literary History and Theory, Historical and Theoretical Poetics
  • Language of fulltext: russian, French, english
  • Full-text formats available: PDF

Publication charges

  • Article Processing Charges (APCs): No
  • Submission charges: No
  • Waiver policy for charges? No

Editorial information

Open access & licensing

  • Type of License: CC BY
  • License terms
  • Open Access Statement: Yes
  • Year open access content began: 2016
  • Does the author retain unrestricted copyright? False
  • Does the author retain publishing rights? False

Best practice polices

  • Permanent article identifier: DOI
  • Content digitally archived in: , Other
  • Deposit policy registered in: None

This journal has '164' articles

Poetics of Octavio Paz’s The Violent Season

Poetics of Octavio Paz’s The Violent Season

Authors: A.V. Gladoshchuk
( 15 downloads)
Abstract

The poetics of Octavio Paz’s book The Violent Season (1958) is in great part defined by its autobiographical canvas: the sequence of the 9 poems that compose the lyrical series corresponds chronologically and geographically with Paz’s peregrinations during 9 years (1948–1957). Thus, the book can be read as a solid poetical text whose lyrical persona repeats Paz’s itinerary (Naples–Venice–Avignon–Paris–India– Tokyo–Geneva–Mexico), crossing the boundaries of different cultural spaces (the Mediterranean–the East–America) and the limits of his own self. The “plot” resembles that of Apollinaire whose intertextual presence is suggested by the title and by the epigraph. Similar to Apollinaire’s poems, the poetical conscience in The Violent Season synthesizes individual and collective memories — the memory of humankind and the memory of Mexican people in particular. This process reaches culmination in the closing text of the book — the poem “Sunstone” whose very structure conveys the idea of history sublimation. On the whole, the book scarcely reflects the poet’s life biography; some poems have conventional space and time that have no reference to specific geography or exact dates when they were written; the act of crossing cultural boundaries is inconspicuous. The autobiographical itinerary is barely outlined; its main function is to represent the archetypical “departure–and–return” scheme. The book’s stylistic homogeneity is evidence of the poet’s maturity; namely, he perceives heterogeneous manifestations of spiritual experience through the grid of universal categories and structures. In accordance to his desire to conciliate “tradition” and “adventure,” Paz appeals to Apollinaire, a poet whose aesthetics is the source of the modern art and therefore may be considered “universal.”

Keywords: Octavio Paz, The Violent Season, Guillaume Apollinaire, intertext, poetical autobiography, poetry and history, universalism
Crocodile Street, Nevsky Prospekt and Beyond. Bruno Schults and Gogol Meeting at the Border

Crocodile Street, Nevsky Prospekt and Beyond. Bruno Schults and Gogol Meeting at the Border

Authors: Yuri Y. Barabash
( 15 downloads)
Abstract

The essay employs the concept of the cultural border/bordering to the comparative analysis of two significant literary texts, namely panoramic descriptions of Crocodile Street by B. Schultz and Nevsky Prospect by Gogol. Here we are dealing with the type of border that may be called spatial and chronological; the introductory part attempts to justify the appropriateness of such approach. The core comparative analysis of the essay touches upon structural, semantical, and poetological levels of these two by the concept of the border and bordering. Pointing out overlapping moments as well as differences sheds light on the problem of modernism in historical perspective and on the processes of influence and heredity from premodernist elements to the modernist poetics as such. Comparing Bruno Schultz with Gogol helps reveal the specificity of the work of the former that is at once unique and typical of modernism. Reading Gogol through Schultz reveals the importance of “Gogol’s lessons” for modernism, their suggestive potential to influence and transform the means of artistic cognition.

Keywords: border/bordering, comparative analysis, modernism, mythologism, poetics, text, narrator
“Between Death and Life” by A.N. Apukhtin: Reincarnation Plot as the Narrative Problem

“Between Death and Life” by A.N. Apukhtin: Reincarnation Plot as the Narrative Problem

Authors: Marsel R. Khamitov
( 15 downloads)
Abstract

A. N. Apukhtin’s story “Between Death and Life” (written shortly before the author’s death) was not published during his lifetime and has been largely overlooked by Russian scholars. However, it is interesting for its unusual “reincarnation” plot requiring the use of nontrivial narrative techniques that allow reproducing posthumous consciousness and the character’s subsequent rebirth within the Ich-Erzählung. This article examines how such “reincarnation” narrative is constructed and how it reflects the main plot of the story — emancipation of the narrator’s consciousness from the material world, his “sortie” into atemporal space, and final rebirth. Methodologically, the article bears on W. Schmid’s narrative classification. Whereas in the first chapters the physical space expels the narrator’s consciousness transforming the Ich-Erzählung into an objective narrative, in the following chapters, the narrator’s mnemonic efforts allow him reach “revelation” and start a new life; such efforts are accompanied by the increasing subjectivation of the narrative. The article examines Apukhtin’s experiments against the background of the Russian 19-th century fantastic fiction, above all V.F. Odoevsky’s story “The Living Dead” that is claimed to be structurally closer to “Between Death and Life” than Leo Tolstoy’s story “The Death of Ivan Ilyich” often considered as Apukhtin’s main source. Yet Apukhtin’s narrative techniques anticipating 20-th century literary experiments differ from the models elaborated within the Russian fantastic tradition as they correspond to that “exotic” plot which Apukhtin chose for his last story.

Keywords: A.N. Apukhtin’s fiction, fantastic plot, narrative experiments
In this Light Church — Korney is the Hierarch: Recurring Images in the Poetry of Korney Chukovsky and His Contemporaries

In this Light Church — Korney is the Hierarch: Recurring Images in the Poetry of Korney Chukovsky and His Contemporaries

Authors: Olga A. Simonova
( 14 downloads)
Abstract

The article examines a poetic portrait of Korney Chukovsky. By introducing the figure of the storyteller into several of his tales, the author launched a tradition of representing himself as a fictional character. Readers perceived the protagonist of his poems accompanied by his portrait as an integral authorial persona. Another way of self-presentation was through identification with fairy tale characters. In the hitherto unknown and unpublished comic poem by Chukovsky, he identifies Korney (his first name) and Barmaley (a character of his fairy tale). Chukovsky’s detachment from the name Korney and the creation of the homonymous character is due to his incomplete appropriation of his pseudonym. Same tendency was typical for Chukovsky’s perception by his contemporaries who developed a playful attitude to the name “Korney” and saw it as independent from its bearer. The article examines how Chukovsky’s contemporaries co-created his fictional image. Writing parodies on his tales, contemporary poets represented Chukovsky as one of the characters of these parodies. Due to the specific nature of the genre, parodies sharpened certain traits of the poet’s character. Chukovsky’s biography also became a subject in contemporary poetry. His remarkable height stood for his own greatness and featured him as a contemporary of great people of the past. The potrayal of Chukovsky became a recurring image in the 20th century literature as it made its way from one work to another.

Keywords: 20th century Russian poetry, biography, Chukovsky’s tales, poetic portrait, parody, author, storyteller, character, unknown poem by Chukovsky
Gulag Poetry as Literary Testimony: Poetical and Epistemic Framework

Gulag Poetry as Literary Testimony: Poetical and Epistemic Framework

Authors: Claudia Pieralli
( 15 downloads)
Abstract

The present survey aims at presenting the corpus of verses composed by the victims of рolitical repressions in the Soviet Union from the point of view of published collections and main critical works, concerning, above all, Stalinian era’s texts. At the same time, the study attempts to elaborate and theoretical and epistemic framework within which we can reasonably approach the study of this literary phenomenon of the 20th century Russian history of culture. We deal, first of all, with the possibility of considering these literary texts in relation to the concept of Testimony, and second, with the attempt to highlight specific structural and aesthetical interrelation between the testimonial function and its literary transfiguration in the specific context of poetical creation and expression process. Later, this corpus of texts is regarded as material for the study of the status of poetical word as an aesthetic object which is able to provide a historical (artistic — widely cultural) testimony of Soviet concentration system. Following this assumption, I will outline the literary means and techniques by which the testimonial function is carried out. Within this theoretical framework, the corpus of poetical texts by Soviet political prisoners constitutes a specific whole in the history of the 20th century Russian literature and should be considered as such in the future studies of the subject.

Keywords: literary testimony, Gulag poetry, “lager” poetry
Who is Vasily Travnikov? Between Literary Hoax and Literary History

Who is Vasily Travnikov? Between Literary Hoax and Literary History

Authors: Akifumi Takeda
( 14 downloads)
Abstract

The Life of Vasily Travnikov (1936) by V. Khodasevich is a literary hoax that introduces a fictional poet, the predecessor of Pushkin, and plausibly tells about his life and work. This character is Khodasevich’s twin of a kind who criticizes literature of the pre-Pushkin era and the initial period of Pushkin’s literary career and claims to create a “Travnikov tradition” comparable to the “Pushkin tradition.” Thus, The Life of Vasily Travnikov is an attempt at “myth creation” typical for the modernist literature. Though the image of Travnikov is not purely autobiographical, it gives an idea about Khodasevich, his poetic work and worldview better than, for example, his famous memoirs Necropolis.

Keywords: Khodasevich, Pushkin, literary hoax, literary history, myth creation
THE IMAGE OF THE AUTHOR IN TATYANA TOLSTAYA’S BLOG

THE IMAGE OF THE AUTHOR IN TATYANA TOLSTAYA’S BLOG

Authors: Olga Peshkova
( 16 downloads)
Abstract

The emergence of online journals and web diaries fostered the development of specific language environment in the blogosphere — the writer’s blog. The blog is a unique multifunction platform that enables creativity and self-expression and it is an effective tool of promoting the author’s work and personality to potential readers. The main feature of the blog genre is its mediality and hypertextual principle of textual organization. This essay examines the specificity of author’s image and its self-manifestations on the example of Tatyana Tolstaya’s web diary. The theoretical part of article is devoted to the study of such concept as “the image of the author” in V.V. Vinogradov and M.M. Bakhtin’s classical studies (the history of the term) and also in recent articles analyzing construction of the author’s virtual identity in the blogosphere. Bearing on the comparative analysis of theoretical works, I argue that the term implies the reflection of the author’s worldview at all the levels of the text (semantic, grammatical, structural, and ideological), however the full implementation of the “image of the author” is impossible without the reader and her perception of the text. The practical part of the article deals with Tolstaya’s case comparing Tolstaya’s image in her blog with her literary image. The structural and functional analysis of the online texts in her blog allows us to reconstruct the virtual identity of Tolstaya determined by her style of narration and authorial intention. The essay argues that Tolstaya’s virtual image is a peculiar mixture of biography and literature: actual biographical facts merge with fiction, as a result of the mask she is putting on as a blog writer.

Keywords: author, the image of the author, author’s mask, blog, blogosphere, virtual personality, writer, writer’s blog, speech mask
“I WILL RETURN / COME BACK TO YOU UNRECOGNIZED”: THE FATE OF POETRY OF MOTHER MARIA IN POST-SOVIET RUSSIA AND IN FRANCE

“I WILL RETURN / COME BACK TO YOU UNRECOGNIZED”: THE FATE OF POETRY OF MOTHER MARIA IN POST-SOVIET RUSSIA AND IN FRANCE

Authors: T. Viсtoroff
( 17 downloads)
Abstract

The article examines the history of the reception of mother Maria’s poetry in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia, in France and in Great Britain. It analyses how her image and “hypostasis” became mythologized in Russian and foreign cultures in the context of mother Maria’s personality and her life-creating orientation. The author distinguishes several periods in the perception of mother Maria’s image (1965, 1989, the 2000s), analyzes the most important “portraits” of mother Maria the poet those that influenced generations; traces the changes in researchers’ approaches to the study of her work.

Keywords: Mother Maria (E. Kuzmina-Karavaeva; Skobtzova), reception, mythologization, “oeuvre - vie”, a Russian European, Godmanhood, sophiology
NATIONAL SPECIFICITY AND ARTISTIC VALUE: AT THE CROSSROADS OF ETHNOCULTURAL DISCOURSE AND AXIOLOGICAL CRITIQUE

NATIONAL SPECIFICITY AND ARTISTIC VALUE: AT THE CROSSROADS OF ETHNOCULTURAL DISCOURSE AND AXIOLOGICAL CRITIQUE

Authors: Кazbek К. Sultanov
( 17 downloads)
Abstract

The article discusses correlation of ethnic, cultural, and axiological approaches as a methodologically relevant problem in literary studies. The weakening interest in the structural and semantic complexity of the literary work and devaluation of the assertion criteria assign a peripheral role to the creative factor in art. As a result, the principle of aesthetic selectivity and the literary approach to the functional role of ethnocultural realities remain in the shadows of axiological relativism. The essay intends to restore the status of “artistic value” as a significant category in literary studies by practicing axiological approach within the literary discourse; it also invites to pay special attention to the semantic complementarity of “national specificity” and “artistic value” respectively. A change of values affects and modifies the state of literature and its self-awareness by opening a new horizon of self-expression and modelling a certain worldview; it reveals productive struggle of established and emerging meanings, traditionalist attitudes and promising artistic intentions. In contemporary literary criticism oriented at the study of the literatures of the peoples of Russia, there is a demand for the reconstruction and reevaluation of national literatures. Such criticism seeks to overcome the existing gap between axiological and cultural aspects of textual analysis.

Keywords: artistic value, ethnic dominant, axiological approach, axiological criteria, significance, reconstruction, reevaluation
Why Was a Baby Devil Born: The Legend about a Blasphemous Communist, Monstrous Births, and the Limits of Religious Didactics

Why Was a Baby Devil Born: The Legend about a Blasphemous Communist, Monstrous Births, and the Limits of Religious Didactics

Authors: Alexander A. Panchenko
( 25 downloads)
Abstract

In 1923, the Russian ethnologist and archaeologist Vasily Smirnov published an article entitled “A Devil is Born. (Contemporary Legend)”. The article dealt with an unusual demonological legend that had appeared short time ago in Soviet Russia. It told a story of a baby devil who was an offspring of one communist. In his commentaries, Smirnov pointed at some parallels between European folk narratives, legends about miraculous icons, the story about the burning bush in the Book of Exodus, beliefs related to succubi and incubi, legends about the birth of antichrist, and Christian eschatology in general. However, those observations require certain corrections. In fact, the narrative about the baby devil is an international legend, and its history can be the ground for general discussion about evolution and functions of didactic stories in Christian culture.

Keywords: banthropology of blasphemy and sacrilege, popular demonology, baby devil, monstrous births, migratory legends
YESENIN’S DRAWINGS AS PART OF THE “REAL” COMMENTARY TO HIS WORKS

YESENIN’S DRAWINGS AS PART OF THE “REAL” COMMENTARY TO HIS WORKS

Authors: Natalya I. Shubnikova-Guseva
( 17 downloads)
Abstract

For the first time, the paper discusses the drawings by Yesenin in his article “Mary’s Keys” (1918) and on the margins of the autograph of the dramatic poem Pugachev (1921) considering them as part of the commentary on these works. The figures of letters in “Mary’s Keys” serve as a key to Yesenin’s understanding of the letters in the Russian alphabet and their literary-historical context. Yesenin considers Russian alphabet or any alphabet not only as a set of letters arranged in a particular order, but also treats it in figurative sense, like the ABC of self-knowledge in the world. The figurative meanings of Yesenin’s drawings in “Mary’s Keys” trace back to his conversations with Andrey Bely, to the ideas of such futurist poets as A. Kruchenykh’s, V. Khlebnikov’s and others, and to the ideas of K. Balmont’s. The drawings in the margins of the Pugachev autograph, especially the picture “The Ears of Rye,” associate the characters of the poem with the power of the earth, agricultural labor, the ear of rye, and relate them to the works of G. I. Uspensky Peasant and Peasant Labor (1880) and The Power of the Earth (1887). Yesenin singled out these series among the literary heritage of Uspensky, as is evidenced in his review <”About Gleb Uspensky”>. The essay therefore argues that Uspensky’s ideas influenced both ideology and figurative language of the poem Pugachev.

Keywords: S. A. Yesenin, drawings, article “The Keys of Mary” (1918), alphabet, Pugachev (1921), < “About Gleb Uspensky”>, G. I. Uspensky

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