DISORDERS OF THE SOUND ARTICULATION IN PRETERM CHILDREN

Journal Title: Journal of Special Education and Rehabilitation - Year 2009, Vol 10, Issue 3

Abstract

Speech and language development is a good indicator of child’s cognitive development. The risk factors influencing development and functioning of prematurely born children are multiple. In addition to articulation disorder, there are motoric, conginitive and social aspects of delayed development. Premature babies are born before they physically ready to leave the womb. However, most babies born after about 26 weeks of gestational age have chances for survival, but they are at a greater risk of medical complications, since the earlier children are born, the less developed their organs are. Aim: To demonstrate basic parameters, establish differences, determine characteristics of disorder of sound articulation in fullterm and preterm children. Methodology: Research was conducted at the Clinics of Child’s Habilitation and Rehabilitation in Novi Sad. The prospective research study was carried out comprising 61 children with mean age of 4 years. The study inclusion criteria were gestational age and birth weight. Regarding these parameters, the children without major neurlologic or system disabilities were included, and they were Serbian speaking. The sample comprised 31 children with GS?38 weeks and body weight of ?3000 g, while the preterm group comprised 30 children with GS?32 weeks and body weight of ?1500 g. Results of the study indicate to a difference between fullterm children and preterm children with regard to articulation disorders, of which the statistically significant was a sound distortion. The overall sample showed that the substitution with distortion was most frequent disorder, while the interdental sigmatism was the most represented one. Conclusion: The obtained results lead to conclusion that preterm children, being a high-risk group, need to be followed up by age two, and provided timely proffesional help at pre-school age, since numerous adverse factors affect their overall development.

Authors and Affiliations

Vesela MILANKOV| Institute for Child's and Youth Health Care of Vojvodina , Aleksandra MIKOV | Clinic of Child Habilitation and Rehabilitation, Novi Sad, Serbia

Keywords

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  • EP ID EP7827
  • DOI -
  • Views 308
  • Downloads 25

How To Cite

Vesela MILANKOV, Aleksandra MIKOV (2009). DISORDERS OF THE SOUND ARTICULATION IN PRETERM CHILDREN. Journal of Special Education and Rehabilitation, 10(3), 52-65. https://europub.co.uk/articles/-A-7827