International Journal of Korean History

International Journal of Korean History

Basic info

  • Publisher: Korea University, Center for Korean History
  • Country of publisher: korea, republic of
  • Date added to EuroPub: 2018/May/12

Subject and more

  • LCC Subject Category: History
  • Publisher's keywords: Korean History
  • Language of fulltext: english
  • Full-text formats available: PDF

Publication charges

  • Article Processing Charges (APCs): No
  • Submission charges: No
  • Waiver policy for charges? No

Editorial information

Open access & licensing

  • Type of License: CC BY-NC
  • License terms
  • Open Access Statement: Yes
  • Year open access content began: 2000
  • Does the author retain unrestricted copyright? False
  • Does the author retain publishing rights? False

Best practice polices

  • Permanent article identifier: DOI
  • Content digitally archived in: Other
  • Deposit policy registered in: None

This journal has '224' articles

he Development of Diplomatic Relations and Trade with Ming in the Last Years of the Koryŏ Dynasty

he Development of Diplomatic Relations and Trade with Ming in the Last Years of the Koryŏ Dynasty

Authors: Jin-han Lee
( 11 downloads)
Abstract

Although it was an unprecedented mega-empire, Yuan began to see signs of agitation in the mid-14th century onwards. Not only did there exist fierce strife for the imperial throne and conflict among the aristocracy but also the misgovernment of Emperor Shundi (Huizong) brought about financial difficulties and the misery of the masses, in turn leading to uprisings nationwide. Originally under the command of Guo Zixing from Haozhou, one of the most powerful forces involved in such unrest, Zhu Yuanzhang (the future Emperor Gaodi or Taizu) declared his independence as the Duke of Wu upon Guo Zixing’s death in 1355 (5th year of King Gongmin’s reign). He then proclaimed himself the King of Wu in 1364 in Nanjing, subdued rival forces such as Zhang Shicheng and Fang Guozhen in 1367, proclaimed himself as the Ming emperor in 1368, and initiated the conquest of Yuan to the north, thus capturing the capital and seizing control of China.

Keywords: Development, Diplomatic Relations, Last Years
Popularization of Mongol Language and Culture in the Late Koryŏ Period

Popularization of Mongol Language and Culture in the Late Koryŏ Period

Authors: Peter I. Yun
( 31 downloads)
Abstract

The Mongol conquest in the thirteenth century was accompanied by great destruction of life and property, but the advent of the Pax Mongolica opened an unprecedented opportunity for open and free exchange of peoples, ideas, and commodities in the Eurasian continent. The Mongol empire brought together many diverse ethnic groups under a single political entity and promoted diffusion of various cultures across Asia. As the ruling group, the Mongols exerted greater cultural impact on conquered peoples, and even the Chinese, who have historically discounted foreign influence and emphasized sinicization of conquerors, were heavily impacted by nomadic Mongol culture.

Keywords: Popularization, Mongol Language, Culture, Late Koryŏ Period
The Focal Issues in the Historical Study of the Koryŏ’s Resistance against Mongol

The Focal Issues in the Historical Study of the Koryŏ’s Resistance against Mongol

Authors: Yong-hyuk Yoon
( 16 downloads)
Abstract

The war between Koryŏ and Mongol lasted over forty years from 1231 to 1273. The Mongol Empire was a worldwide empire gaining the mastery of Eurasia as well as the Continent of China. Upon its destruction of Jin Dynasty in 1234 which ruled the northern China, the empire intensified its attack on Koryŏ as an effort to put its pressure upon the southern Song. However, Koryŏ never alleviated the level of its resistance to Mongol. Mongol, on the other hand, lightened its original aim to gain Koryŏ’s subjection to them under certain conditions as the war turned out to be a longer one. Its intention was to recognize Koryŏ’s independence and keep Koryŏ under its control at the same time. The Mongol Empire demanded Koryŏ only two definite conditions: one was for the King of Koryŏ to bow before the Khan and the other was for Koryŏ to move back its capital from Kanghwa Island, a refuge capital back to Kaekyung, its original capital. The latter was a practical demand for the Mongol Empire to exercise its sovereignty over Koryŏ whereas the former was merely symbolic.

Keywords: The Focal Issues, Historical Study, Koryŏ's Resistance
Relation with Japan in the Era of Koryŏ

Relation with Japan in the Era of Koryŏ

Authors: Jongwoo Na
( 16 downloads)
Abstract

Relation with Japan in the era of Koryŏ was the most stagnant making the least progress in all the areas including politics, economics, diplomacy and military envoy as opposed to before and after the period. The reason for such depressed international relations between the two countries back then was closely related to the circumstances in the Eastern Asia of the time. The international situation of the Eastern Asia in the year 918, in which Koryŏ was established, fell into utter confusion where China experienced internal disorder of five dynasty changes. Moreover, Japan abolished Kyŏndangsa (遣唐使) to Tang dynasty under the reign of Genki (延喜) so that diplomatic relations between Japan and China had already been broken off.

Keywords: Relation with Japan, Era of Koryŏ
Japanese Residents in Korea and the Modernization of Chosŏn : A Preliminary analysis based on the case of the conflicts related to the Panggongnyŏng (防穀令, Grain Export Prohibition Order)

Japanese Residents in Korea and the Modernization of Chosŏn : A Preliminary analysis based on the case of the conflicts related to the Panggongnyŏng (防穀令, Grain Export Prohibition Order)

Authors: Ryosuke Yamada
( 21 downloads)
Abstract

The debate over the issue of ‘colonial modernity’, in which Korean academics have occupied the central role, has in recent years become increasingly active. As a detailed analysis of all the aspects of this debate is beyond the scope of this study, the focus herein is on a recently published book which was produced as a result of a joint research project between Korea and Japan. This particular work assumes a unique standpoint on the issue of ‘colonial modernity’ in that unlike the existing positive view of ‘modernization in colony’, it, therefore, attempts to raise awareness of the problematic issues incorporated in such ‘modernity’.1 The new standpoint on colonial modernity introduced in the abovementioned book represents an attempt to relativize the heretofore positively evaluated ‘modernity’ or ‘modernization’, which in turn has been based on an assessment of ‘modernization in colony’ rooted in the economic growth achieved during the Japanese colonial era.2 Furthermore, the presentation of the debate over colonial modernity from this new perspective can lead to a reorganization of the standpoint from which the modernization of the Korean peninsula is viewed, i.e. based on a notion of ‘modernity’ that can be commonly applied to global history rather than only to a certain country’s history.

Keywords: Japanese Residents, Modernization, Preliminary analysis based
China's Northeast Project and Trends in the Study of Koguryŏ History

China's Northeast Project and Trends in the Study of Koguryŏ History

Authors: Hokyo Yeo
( 29 downloads)
Abstract

While the three East Asian countries have on the one hand recently advocated the building of a regional community designed to ensure coexistence and co-prosperity, they have also focused on strengthening traditional nationalism in order to secure national unity and grasp the reigns of regional leadership. Ultra-nationalists in Japan have long been less than adverse to distorting history in order to beautify the exploitative nature of Japanese imperialism. China has also begun to engage in the distortion of history, even going as far as attempting to incorporate segments of Korean history into its own. In this regard, it will be impossible for the three East Asian nations to establish peaceful cooperative relations as long as such distortions of history remain rampant. Furthermore, unlike Europe, where the concept of the nation was formed during the modern era, the three East Asian nations possess relatively strong ethnic identities that developed as a result of a history that has unfolded from early on at the nation (nationality) level. Under such circumstances, attempts by one country to emphasize its own nationalism while distorting the history of itsneighbors, are bound to lead to mutual distrust.

Keywords: China's Northeast Project, Trends, Koguryŏ History
The Current State of Studies on the Japanese Colonial Era and Related Issues : With a special focus on the studies produced in the 21st century

The Current State of Studies on the Japanese Colonial Era and Related Issues : With a special focus on the studies produced in the 21st century

Authors: Horyong Lee
( 21 downloads)
Abstract

The study of modern Korean history, which includes the Japanese colonial era, began to come into its own at the beginning of the 1980s. Since then, enthusiasm for the study of modern Korean history has continued unabated, with two hundred and fifteen papers on the Japanese colonial era produced in 1997 alone.1 This number grew to two hundred and forty in 1999, constituting a 10% increase over the previous year’s output.

Keywords: The Current State, Studies, Japanese Colonial Era, Related Issues
Korea and The Ballot-The International Dimension in Korea Political Development as seen in Elections

Korea and The Ballot-The International Dimension in Korea Political Development as seen in Elections

Authors: Sooja Kim
( 14 downloads)
Abstract

It would be no overstatement to claim that foreign rather than Korean scholars, and especially American ones, have been at the forefront of the studies on Korean contemporary politics conducted since 1945. However, during the early stages of such studies, rather than being motivated by pure academic interest, researchers tended to focus their attention on the conducting of analyses and evaluations of the United States’ policies toward Korea. In other words, the studies published by American researchers during this initial period were mainly concerned with an evaluation of U.S. policy in Korea, and with the ruling policies put in place by the United States Army Military Government in Korea (USAMGIK) during the military government period, or at the time of the establishment of the Republic of Korea.

Keywords: International, Dimension, Korea Political
The Protestant Church as a Political Training Ground in Modern Korea

The Protestant Church as a Political Training Ground in Modern Korea

Authors: Chung-shin Park
( 29 downloads)
Abstract

A great majority of the personages on the political scene right after the liberation in 1945 were Protestant church leaders and members. In addition to moderate to left-wing leaders such as Kim Kyusik, Yo Unhyong, Kang Yang'uk and Ch'oe Yonggon, major personalities of the right such as Syngman Rhee, Kim Ku, Cho Mansik, Yi Yunyong and Yi Siyong were also church leaders or Christians. Especially after the emergence of two separate regimes in the north and the south, in the south, Christians came to occupy some 40 percent of political leadership positions, even though they constituted less than 10 percent of the south This article is a revision of my paper, which I read at the symposium on “The Impact of Christianity on Korean Culture' at the Center for Korean Studies, University of California, Los Angeles, held on Mat 7, 2004. It is based on my previous works, such as Chung-shin Park, Protestantism and Politics in Korea (Seattle and London: University of Washington Press, 2003; Pak Chongsin (Chung-shin Park), Han'guk kidokkyosa insik (A New Understanding of Korean Church History), (Seoul: Hye'an, 2004), Han'guk kidokkto ilgi (A Historical Reading of Korean Christianity), (Seaol: Tarakbang, 2004) and so forth.

Keywords: Protestant Church, Political Training Ground
The Church as a Public Space : Resources, Practices, and Communicative Culture in Korea

The Church as a Public Space : Resources, Practices, and Communicative Culture in Korea

Authors: Yong-Shin Park
( 13 downloads)
Abstract

In the last decades of the nineteenth century, Korean society was unexpectedly thrown into waves of change through a widespread globalizing process. Some view this as marking the ultimate inroad of capitalism into pre-modern agrarian Korea, whereas others argue that it was the beginning of the end of its five hundred years of sovereignty. There are, however, several other features of social change in Korea that beg for some additional analysis. What is perhaps most interesting among them is that the motif of self-assertion was beginning to make its appearance in a variety of ways. Protestant Christianity acted effectively at this historical juncture to challenge a world-view in which nobody was free from the fetters of traditional habits, namely doing full justice to the social positions one occupied. It had the potential of being a social and cultural movement to reshape this world-view.

Keywords: Church, Public Space, Resources, Practices, Communicative Culture
The Role of Christian Nationalists in the Sin΄ganhoe Movement

The Role of Christian Nationalists in the Sin΄ganhoe Movement

Authors: Kweon-jeong Kim
( 20 downloads)
Abstract

The main forces behind the national movements that emerged in the aftermath of the March 1st Movement of 1919 were the nationalist and socialist factions. This dichotomy was in large part the result of the widespread allure of socialism as a new methodology for the national movement in the eyes of the Korean youth and students. While the nationalist and socialist camps came into frequent conflict with one another over their differing perceptions and methodologies vis-à-vis the national movement, the two groups began from the mid-1920s onwards, as part of efforts to strengthen the overall capabilities of the national camp, to search for ways to overcome the mutual distrust that existed between the two factions and integrate their respective movements. These efforts finally resulted in February 1927 in the joint formation of the Sinǯganhoe (ៈ຃⃵, New Korea Society) as a vehicle for the resolution of national problems. The two groups however continued to adhere to their own strategies and goals. Korean Christians, who had established themselves as one of the main sources of resistance to Japanese imperialism from early onwards, actively participated, along with the Chǯǂndogyo (ᷘሓဓ, Religion of the Heavenly Way), in these efforts to integrate the nationalist camp into a comprehensive national group after the March 1st Movement.

Keywords: Minjokhyŏpdongchŏnsŏnnon (Theory of a unified front), Sin΄ganhoe (New Korea Society), Christian group, YMCA, Kidoksinuhoe (Association of Christians)
Christian Women's Movement in Korean Modern history and Peace & Unification Movement

Christian Women's Movement in Korean Modern history and Peace & Unification Movement

Authors: Jeong-ran Yun
( 15 downloads)
Abstract

Experiences under the Japanese occupation, wars and South-North division are major factors in shaping the lives of Korean women. 50-yearold division on the Korean Peninsula aggravated pains afflicted on women, along with spread of militarism culture. For women who experienced the modern history and considering the Korean situation in progress, peace and unification movement become the significant issue. Therefore, Korean women aggressively participated in peace and unification movement and anti-war campaigns through South-North exchanges. For the sake of peace and unification movement, women set up organizations and take actions thank to th on-going active actions of Christian women.

Keywords: Korean Christian women, Colony, Korean war, South-North Division, Korean Women NGOs, Peace Movements, Movements for Reunification
Baekje's Relationship with Japan in the 6th Century

Baekje's Relationship with Japan in the 6th Century

Authors: Hyun-Sook Park
( 58 downloads)
Abstract

The goal of the present study is to elucidate the nature of foreign relations between Baekje (ᓏ᱕) and Japan's Yamato regime in the 6th century. The relations between Korea and Japan in the 6th century is recorded extensively in ØNihon Shoki (ᬝᔲᙠᄀ)Ù . Although Japan had relations with several countries in Korea, the focus of the book is heavily placed on Baekje. Therefore, unveiling the nature of foreign relations between Baekje and the Yamato regime of Japan in the 6th century is important to determine the actual situation of Korea-Japan relations in ancient times.

Keywords: 6th Century, Baekje and Japan, Foreign relations, Excange of resources, Goguryeo, Silla, Daegaya
The Yangban’s Perception of the Ideal Economic Life During the Mid-Chosŏn Era

The Yangban’s Perception of the Ideal Economic Life During the Mid-Chosŏn Era

Authors: Uk Lee
( 15 downloads)
Abstract

Chosǂn sought to implement a state management system that was based on Neo-Confucianism. In this regard, the lifestyle of the yangban class that belonged to the ruling elite of Chosǂn was one that was also geared towards the achievement of the tenets of the Neo-Confucian ideology. The members of this class were expected to focus on selfcultivation and the moral betterment of their families (᜙៕ᱢ๟, sushin chega) while furthering their knowledge of the classics. In addition, they were presumed to live a life of poverty and abstain from the amassment of private fortunes and pursuit of personal interests.1 To this end, a look at the individual travelogues and essays written after the 17th century, when the Yigi simsǂnghak (፜ხ៟ᚽ῀, study of principles, material force, and nature) and myǂngbunnon (Ꮩᕰጁ, theory of justification) were emphasized, reveals that the majority of these individuals lived a life of poverty and were devoid of any economic basis. In their works, these individuals expounded on their lack of any interest in the amassing of family fortunes, while expressing a desire to maintain their standing as Neo-Confucian scholars. Although obviously detached from reality, this appears to have been regarded by the yangban of Chosǂn as the ideal lifestyle.

Keywords: Mid-Chosŏn Era, Economic Life, Perception of the Economic Life, Yangban, Neo-Confucianism
The First Russo-Chinese Allied Treaty of 1896

The First Russo-Chinese Allied Treaty of 1896

Authors: Igor V. Lukoianov
( 25 downloads)
Abstract

Up to the end of XIX century the Russo-Chinese relations cannot be named friendly. Two empires had never war between them, but were afraid of each other, suspiciously concerned to plans and actions of the neighbour. The concluded agreements covered either questions of border, or development of trade. However a lot of changes took place in the region by the end of XIX century. The way to the allied treaty of Russia and China was uneasy: it had demanded serious revision of policy both in Petersburg and in Peking. The principal cause, moved two empires to the allied relations, was the Korean question, which was shaken in the second half of 1880th. The kingdom which was in vassal dependence from China became the aim for undisguised Japanese claims. This was the main case of instability in the Far East that time. In the beginning of 1890th Russia and China aspired to preserve status quo in the region because they were weak and dreamed only to protect their own boundaries.

Keywords: Russo-Chinese relations, Eastern Chinese railway, S.Iu. Witte, Li Hung Chang, Russia and Sino-Japanese war

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